Keith Wilson

Hoxton Studio 1990

About:

After leaving artschool in 1990 I was based in London for over 20 years, with studios in Hoxton, then Bermondsey and finally Haggerston, before five years in Sheffield with a studio at S1 Artspace. I moved to New York in 2016 and currently my studio is in Red Hook. Everything I do is through the studio. It allows me to think sculptural thoughts and make sculptural works. My studio is a sociable place for objects and people, where bodies and materials come and go like the tide, a space for thinking and entertaining all-comers.

Red Hook Studio 2020

Bit More:

Keith Wilson is a New York–based British sculptor. He has had solo exhibitions at the MAC Belfast, Camden Arts Centre and Milton Keynes Gallery. He was featured in British Art Show 7 and was co-curator (with Penelope Curtis) of Modern British Sculpture at the Royal Academy in 2011. He was a trustee of Whitechapel Art Gallery and Camden Arts Centre for many years and was involved in major building projects at both venues.

Interested in the cultural status of sculpture and the extent to which sculpture can play a part in social transformation, his outdoor works range from transforming the interior of the Park Hill estate in Sheffield (Europe’s largest listed structure) into a public sculpture park for Sculpture Park Hill, to Steles, 35 buoyant sculptures commissioned for the Olympic and Paralympic Games in 2012, which now serves as both event reminder and river infrastructure.

Wilson’s projects are an enquiry into the contingency of meaning, specifically in relation to the public function of sculpture. An exploration of the power relations inherent in everyday human interactions, his sculptures are often dramatized by passersby, who must navigate around his seemingly authoritative pieces of highly ordered sculptural material. By simultaneously channelling bodies and ordering abstract ideas, the works encourage interpretative resistance and imaginative reordering of the encounter according to the visitor’s own agency—their individual perversity of mind.