Keith Wilson

Selected Projects:

  1. The vast interior landscape of Park Hill transformed to become an inner-city drive-through sculpture park for the city of Sheffield. Park Hill Plinths is a permanent site-specific public sculpture integrated into the altered interior landscape of the iconic Brutalist Grade 2* Park Hill estate in Sheffield, the largest listed structure in Europe. The inaugural and only permanent work set in the new landscape the site-specific installation features a series of five disc-shaped concrete plinth bases positioned at various intervals across the 3.5-acre site. The 3.18 metre diameter of each plinth directly refers to the basic unitary grid plan of the surrounding Park Hill flats. Using the same concrete mix originally used for the buildings and with their heights based on the estate’s incremental plateaus, the plinths are strongly linked both to the typography and to the material reality of the site. The Park Hill Plinths installation serves to announce the arrival of a new sculpture park Sculpture Park Hill, and helps set the scene for a planned new art museum.

    Located within the Manor Castle neighbourhood, amongst the 10% most deprived areas in England, this project establishes a site to encounter and experience sculpture where the immediate community may not otherwise have the opportunity. Re-voicing a post-war socialist ideal of utilising the potential for the sculptural encounter to instigate a radically changed society, and re-awakening the utopian vision that the 1960s Park Hill estate was a key part of, Park Hill Plinths and Sculpture Park Hill serve to revive this concept of sculpture and architecture as a catalyst for social transformation, keeping the project closely bound to Park Hill’s history, indeed becoming the latest chapter of it.

    Sculpture Park Hill

    • 2017
    • Sheffield

    The vast interior landscape of Park Hill transformed to become an inner-city drive-through sculpture park for the city of Sheffield.

  2. This work foregrounds how things are organised and how space is organised and who organises things in space. I organise things in space. And others organise me.

    I wonder what things are capable of meaning, how and why we come to attach meanings and significances to objects. Calendar turns a wall planner into the four walls of a studio, a diary into a built environment. Looking from the outside in, you peer into the space of the artist’s studio through porous walls. Look from the inside out and you see the gallery’s constructed walls framing the work as the work frames you. Gallery and studio make competing claims on the subject of art, and with this installation I invite the visitor to experience the contest of competing frames.

    Mixing component elements gifted by members of the public alongside small studio works and items from his own life the artist produces a field of enquiry developed in the studio that is readily transposed to the space of exhibition. Encouraging of touch and close engagement an aura of horizontal exchange is established that encourages the visitor to imagine herself artist, critic, curator, composer, contributor, thief, all within the single visit.

    The project emphasises the ‘thereness’ of things, stopping just before a collapse into a meaningless excess of stuff, offering things their place in public life, offering anything a chance for monumentality in so far as it serves to remind.

    As quantum mechanics places one paradox at the centre of our material world, so we find direct exposure to the nature of our own object relations unsettling in its resistance to steady interpretation. It seems it is we who are unmoored. The thing alongside its story, sold to us as basic building blocks of reality, are found uncoupled from any such epistemological footings.

    Out in the city square a caged space is made for the domesticated beast – holding pen for a big dog, or perhaps a memorial sculpture, like a mort-cage or a fenced grave that celebrating cats can weave through. King is dead..

    Calendar

    • 2016
    • Belfast
  3. Q, “What does it mean?” A,“Art.”

    Sign for Art

    • 2014–
    • Leeds

    Q, “What does it mean?” A,“Art.”

  4. Inaugural exhibition, a collaboration with artist Richard Woods

    P3

    • 2007
    • London

    Inaugural exhibition, a collaboration with artist Richard Woods

  5. The temporary artwork ‘Puddle’ installed as part of The Aerodrome’ show in celebration of the life of Michael Stanley. The curators asked that the work remain as a permanent memorial work. Michael Stanley originally commissioned the piece 20 years back in 1999. ikon-gallery.org theguardian.com

    Puddle

    • (1999) 2019–
    • Birmingham
  6. Project at Wellcome Collection that sought to reveal; the behind-the-scenes ‘everyday’ workings of the museum; the meanings people invest in objects, whether special or ordinary; and the private ‘studio’ of the artist. The exhibition began as an empty sculptural framework occupying the whole ground floor exhibition space. This became the architecture into which members of the public were invited to contribute their objects, which, after being received in person were quickly photographed, catalogued and put on open exhibition. In a neat reversal of the usual collection-museum relation, this was the first time a museum opened ‘empty’, and allowed the collection to walk through the front door, brought by the public. The speed and quality of accessioning led to viral interest, spiking the museum’s online activity. Visitors’ participation revealed their own value systems – their social, political, personal and aesthetic choices. I borrowed from the figure of Henry Wellcome, assuming the role of artist as collector, with studio as my repository. Making visible the unseen workings of studio and museum, the division between private and public worlds was dramatized in the handing over of an object from the public visitor side of the museum to the project’s private enclosure.

    Things

    • 2010
    • London

    Project at Wellcome Collection that sought to reveal; the behind-the-scenes ‘everyday’ workings of the museum; the meanings people invest in objects, whether special or ordinary; and the private ‘studio’ of the artist.

  7. About the Library

    Library

    • 1999
    • Preston
  8. Steles Project Description

    Steles

    • 2012–
    • London
  9. Co-curated with Penelope Curtis, commissioned by The Royal Academy. A critical reflection on what became an export franchise through the last century. By posing questions such as ‘what is British?’ and ‘what is Sculpture?’, we investigated the relationship of these propositions in the form of an exhibition.

    Set both physically and ‘emotionally’ within the Main Galleries and courtyard of the Royal Academy, the exhibition looked at British sculpture in an international context: at the ways in which Britain’s links with its Empire, continental Europe, South America and the United States, have all helped shape an art which at its best is truly international.  It explored how Britain’s sculpture has repeatedly served as a barometer for national standing.

    The curatorial proposition was led by the sculptures themselves, in long sequences of interconnected spaces that encouraged diachronic pairings and ripostes. The exhibition gave voice to the nascent dialogue between the sculptures themselves thereby inviting visitors to pay fresh attention to many of the major works of the century. This combination of close scrutiny and comparison – where the eye is free to make connections across time and place – brought all the works up to the present within the Royal Academy’s galleries. The exhibition offered an interpretation of the problematics that have been played out in sculpture through the twentieth century.

    Modern British Sculpture

    • 2011
    • London

    Co-curated with Penelope Curtis, commissioned by The Royal Academy. A critical reflection on what became an export franchise through the last century.

  10. Compton Verney Description

    Compton Verney

    • 2003
    • Warwickshire
  11. I was commissioned by Penelope Curtis along with sculptors Tobias Rehberger and Joelle Tuerlinckx to make a response together to the question ‘what is Sculpture?’ Our answer was an exhibition some 18 months later: ‘The Object Sculpture’ at the Henry Moore Institute in Leeds.

    The Object Sculpture

    • 2012
    • Leeds

    I was commissioned by Penelope Curtis along with sculptors Tobias Rehberger and Joelle Tuerlinckx to make a response together to the question ‘what is Sculpture?’

  12. Camden Arts Center Description

    Camden Arts Center

    • 1995
    • London
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